" In this universe the night was falling; the shadows were lengthening towards an east that would not know another dawn. But elsewhere the stars were still young and the light of morning lingered; and along the path he once had followed, Man would one day go again"

Arthur C. Clarke Against the Fall of Night

Monday, September 19, 2016

New Arrivals

I realize I have not been posting very much over 
the course of summer and I now will be taking a bit of 
a hiatus till mid-Oct. as my wife and I have some plans. I 
may still comment on other sites, and hopefully I can be a 
little more prolific going forward.

After a couple trips to Fair's Fair books I do have some books
to look forward to. Some quick math has told me that it is 
unlikely I will finish all the books already in the house before
the great Starmaker returns me to the multi-universe or 
whatever happens but what I hell I bought more.


I knew I wanted The Eskimo Invasion since I saw the cover
on Joachim Boaz's site


I am also content with the suggested cover attribution of 
Stephen Miller. 

Killer Pine is a sequel to Cold War in a Country Garden,
which I have not read, the cover is by Chris Foss I am more
 accustomed to seeing his spaceships but I am a sucker 
for giant insects. Also the blurb on the back begins 
" The Canadian forests are dying." Given that the Inuit, 
Rockies and forests are such a big part of the 
 Canadian identity I had to get both books.


Two Laumer's, covers by Josh Kirby who has a lot to answer for.


We have some horror and some SF maybe a combination
of both, I love the genre crossing that occurs in some SF.

The covers, The Witching Hour, no attribution
The  Rithian Terror, Chris Achilleos
Beware the Beasts, Jack Fargasso
Can you Feel Anything…, Hans Arnold


The Listeners cover? the interior illustrations are by 
Lance Williams but the style seems different. I was happy to get 
two Gunn's I enjoyed his comments on SF in the anthology series 
The Road to Science Fiction that he edited and while I read 
The Immortals many years ago my recollection is that it was 
quite good.


The Lincoln Hunters, cover by the Dillons.
I have heard nothing but good things about this novel
and I have enjoyed the Tucker I have read so far.


Orbitsville, nice cover by David Schleinkofer.
Dyson sphere-like artefact, cool!


Saturday, September 10, 2016

Bud Webster (1952-2016)

 This summer I was at the cabin which meant I did not post as much as I had planned. It also meant that I did not order lots of books from ABE because I did not have room to bring them back what with our tools, my wife's telescope and 3 dogs. There was also the possibility of a postal strike which curbed my enthusiasm. So I did something almost as fun, agonized endlessly about my first order. When these obstacles were out of the way, I was interested in four volumes of Ballantine's six volume series by William Tenn, published in 1968.

For lovely photos of all six volumes see the great SF blog unsubscrbedblog.

https://unsubscribedblog.wordpress.com/2013/09/24/a-william-tenn-reader/

Another potential purchase was the first five volumes of the Alpha anthologies edited by Silverberg, Bud Webster has been my go to authority on anthologies since I first stumbled across his essays on the web (link below) so I did some googling. 





It was then I learned that Bud had passed away in Feb. 2016. Bud was not much older than I am and one thing that had attracted me to his essays on anthologies and important
SF authors was that many were books and writers important to me in my youth. The portrait he painted of himself as a bookish boy disinterested in sports who saw the library as a safe and welcoming place and SF as it's greatest attraction was also familiar to me.




I have have read, bought and accumulated SF most of my life, but my focus has changed over the years. I collected small press but they got expensive, pulps largely for the covers but I have run out of room to display them and I will not buy them to keep them in boxes. A number of the blogs I currently follow focus on 1960's and 1970's SF and I have been using them to point me to authors and works I have missed.




However my first love was always the Sf short story, thanks Ray, so Bud was a revelation. All the information I could possibly want on anthology series in one place. I started with
the bricks (heavy books) as he described them Adventures in Time and Space by by Healy & McComas and many of Groff Conklin's including the enormous hardcovers The Best of Science
Fiction, The Big Book of Science Fiction, The Treasury of Science Fiction, Omnibus of Science Fiction. while I my wife and I had some anthologies especially Wollheim' Best of anthologies, many edited by Bleiler, Dikty, Merril, Pohl, Silverberg, Knight, Carr, Aldiss Harrison, Carnell etc. have followed. To avoid wallowing in nostalgia I have collected current best 
of series by editors like Gardner Dozois and the late David Hartwell as well.

I did buy the Alpha as for the Tenn's, well lets ask Bud.

"Not that it matters, really, since I was an ardent fan of William Tenn from whenever I first ran across him. I recall clearly the plans I had for my weekly pay when I was sixteen and delivering papers in the hills around Roanoke. I had a long list of albums (Mothers of Invention, Electric Prunes, Yardbirds and other soft-rock hits) and books I wanted to buy, and among them was the lovely little matched six-volume set of William Tenn stories that Ballantine brought out in 1968. I had to get them one at a time, as they came out, but I was proud of that little row of books and I showed them off to my other sf-reading friends."

from Past Masters, In a Klass By Himself (or, Tops On a Scale of One to Tenn)

by Bud Webster



Thanks Bud





More information and links on Bud Webster follow and you will read more about Bud's influence and the anthologies he lead me to in future posts.

"Bud Webster lived surrounded by more than 10,000 books, from ratty, dog-eared paperbacks to rare, signed first editions. There were books in every room except the smallest ones, and occasionally (like Scrooge McDuck) he liked to gather them all in a pile in the middle of the floor, toss them up in the air, and let them come down and hit him on the head. A columnist for the SFWA Bulletin and frequent contributor to the "Curiosities" page of F&SF, he was the author of 41 Above the Rest: An Index and Checklist for the Anthologies of Groff Conklin, the definitive bio-bibliography on the subject, as well as The Joy of Booking: Webster's Guide to Buying and Selling Used SF and Fantasy Books. He also wrote fiction, but not nearly often enough to suit Mary, his Significant Other. He lived in Richmond, Virginia, with the long-suffering Mary and three damn cats."

Sadly Bud died in February 2016 - he will be sorely missed but his memory will live on in the columns below and his writings elsewhere

from http://www.philsp.com/articles/webster_index.html

This links also provides links to pdf's of many of his columns.

For more information on Bud Webster the following link is also useful.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Frank Herbert #1, Hellstrom's Hive




  Hellstrom's Hive, Bantam Books,  1973 (1982) cover by Paul Lehr

I mentioned in my last post my intention to look back at the works of some of the authors that were important to my teenage years. Frank Herbert was my first choice. I will concentrate on non-Dune work. I loved Dune, the vast implied history provided in the epigrams, the replacement of computers with mentats, the limitations on projectile weapons that gave it an archaic Planet Stories vibe with it’s duels, ornithopters and worms, the ecological message with its water reclamation and stillsuits. I did not really care for the two subsequent books or the franchise that grew out of them. As an archaeology prof once said, he used Dune to build up Paul and the next two to undermine much of book one, and I agreed. I know now there was a reason and I will discuss it as it relates to Hellstrom’s Hive later.

A friend recommended I read Hellstrom;’s Hive, I think as much to get my impressions as based on any fondness for the book. It follows that well worn SF path of insects and insect based societies, this is not a spoiler as the title and the first epigram both give this away

“ Words of the brood mother, Trova Hellstrom. I welcome the day when I will go into the vats and become one with all our people. 

                                               (Dated October 26, 1896)” (1)

The book begins with Carlos Depeaux observing The Farm, the location in Oregon where Nils Hellstrom creates nature documentaries on insects. Carlos and his partner Tymiena Grinelli work for a shadowy government or quasi-government body called the Agency. They have been dispatched to learn the fate of a previous agent Julius Porter who disappeared earlier while observing Hellstrom’s activities. The Agency is not the FBI or CIA  and appears to be motivated as much by commercial advantage as credible security threats. Indeed that initial investigation of Hellstrom’s activities began when an Agency operative copied a file that was left unguarded by a Hellstrom staff member in the MIT library. It described their work on Project 40, “a toroidal field disrupter” a electron (or particle) pump capable of influencing physical matter at a distance. (10) While experts tell the Agency that if it works, under certain conditions, it “could shatter the earth’s crust with disastrous consequences for all life on our planet.” (11) the  Agency is primarily interested in forcing Hellstrom to share this technology with them for use in metallurgy, the potential destructive power of the device does not seem to be a concern. Dzule Peruge the manager who eventually takes over the investigation is told by a board member “ You will inform the Chief that there must be profit in this somewhere.” (32) The Agency is painted in the most unflattering terms, once enlisted or sometimes coerced into joining, agents cannot leave. Utter secrecy about their work is required, they cannot quit, personal relationships are frowned on and children are forbidden. Upon retirement the best agents can hope for is to live out their lives in a Agency run retirement community. Peruge is an incredible misogynist and the organization incredibly mercenary, with little regard for the live of others including their own staff. Arrayed against the Agency we have another organization, Hellstrom’s Hive, while this is a hive society with a ruling council, Nils Hellstrom, the “prime male”, is very much in charge. He can call on all the resources of the hive, including a group of super scientists we meet later in the story. These “physical workers” have created technology, stun wands, advanced radio gear, nutritional additives etc. already superior to that of the Outside as the non-hive world is called. This enables hive members to potentially live hundreds of years. There are also a number of hive members working in positions of authority in the outside world, a senator, a judge, a deputy in Fosterville, the nearest town, among others, who have used their authority to protect the hive and it is this pro-hive network who has forced the Agency to work clandestinely.  Many hive members whose duties require a knowledge of the Outside are released temporarily from the hive for formal education or life experience among the Outsiders and their world. Other appear human but are mute, since the hive relies on hand signals and other non-verbal communication. The story moves quickly, the suspense is handled well as the conflict between the Agency and the hive intensifies as more agents disappear and more security organizations become involved. The tension grows and more and more details of the hive (mostly unpleasant) are revealed as we move towards what was for me a bit of a  Deus ex machina ending.

Interspersed with the action are Herbert’s signature epigrams, most are hive generated , Hellstrom’s journal entries, hive manuals, meetings of board meeting etc. However I did not find these as useful or engaging as those provided for Dune.  We learn the hive, it appears to be the only one, was founded by Trova Hellstrom in April of 1876, after 300 years among the Outsiders (47) but that is all the history Herbert provides, we don’t seem to have the same devotion to world building we see in Dune.  Trove mentions the “blessed Mendel” (48) but this does not seem to go anywhere either and Herbert’s passion for new or modified religions is not evident here.

I did enjoy Hellstrom’s Hive and anyone interested in societies modelled on insects should find it worth reading. It also provides a great look at Herbert’s creative process as a simple google search would demonstrate, more on that in the Spoilers and Quibbles section.

Spoilers and Quibbles

Herbert’s thought process in writing Hellstrom’s Hive can be seen in this quote from Wikipedia.

"David L. Wolper's quasi-documentary film The Hellstrom Chronicle, released in 1971, was the inspiration for Herbert's novel.[1] In an interview with Tim O'Reilly, Herbert stated: "I said, 'In terms of what we want now, as we think of our world now, what would be the most horrible kind of civilization you could imagine?' And then I said, 'Now I will make... [the members of that civilization] the heroes of the story, by taking negative elements of the surrounding society and treating them as the villain.' That creates a very peculiar kind of tension.”

In both goals I think Herbert was successful, to some extent the hive does fulfill the role of hero, after discussing the book with the friend who recommended it, we both agreed we found ourselves siding with Hellstrom against the Agency early on. This does create the tension Herbert talks about because you know the hive is a dangerously regimented society with no personal liberty for its members who are recycled for food when their usefulness ends. By pitting them against the Agency whose agents may be “swamped” murdered and disposed of in swamp if they prove troublesome there is little to choose from and no personal liberty on either side. The fact that the Agency is acting from a profit motive rather than a security focus also helps create the tension Herbert was seeking.

It is interesting to see Herbert’s writing is sometimes inspired by specific pre-determined goals rather than the plot alone, Damien Broderick in The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction (51) states “The deep irony of Dune’s popular triumph, and that of its many sequels, is Herbert’s own declared intention to undermine exactly that besotted identification with the van Vogtian superman-hero.” so we can see that the same impulse was working in Dune,  Herbert treats his novels as a form of intellectual exercise . Whether this  sometimes hurts the end product depends I guess on the reader but it certainly encourages Herbert to colour outside the lines of the expected tropes now and then. 

Quibbles

Hellestrom pays his film staff (hive members) but doesn’t collect income tax, we know where that gets you. Also certain things like the hive members wandering around the farm scantily clad or naked seem like a poor way of deflect attention. 

But my main frustration is the fact that we are not provided with any extended history for the hive. With the exception of the physical workers, stunted humans with large heads that are carried from place to place or ride in little cars, similar to the man of future beloved of early SF pulps, the hive members seem distressing human. Herbert makes no attempt, I am not sure how he would do it but I would like to see an attempt, to show us the view point of a worker with a little self realization or personal autonomy. I wonder if having satisfied the conditions he set in the quote above he did not bother to devote the energy needed to develop the hive concept fully. Certainly I want to know how group that (founded?) the hive started, how this all worked. In discussing the physical workers, Hellstrom says, “ They had proved their worth countless times and were a major reason the first colonists had ended their secretive migrations.” (198) what times? what other reasons? what migrations? I want details mister!

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Tuesday we took Shaun, our Shih Tzu cross, to Prince Albert 
for a haircut. Every trip to PA includes a stop at Value Village 
for T-shirts, hoodies etc. to wear around the cabin.
 While at the cabin my SF collecting mostly stops
so I was delighted to see some great SF books for 1 to 2 
dollars. Some I already have but most of these have different 
covers and some can stay  at the cabin.
 I see SF cover art as time capsules to the societal and 
artistic trends and/or concerns of the period and if 
the price is right I will buy a second copy.



cover by Barclay Shaw

I decided to read or reread some of the SF authors of 
 my teenage years I am starting with Frank Herbert but
 I will follow with Niven who produced 
some of the great SF of his generation.


cover by Walter Velez (1966) 1981

Very different, more modern and futuristic than the other
covers I have seen for The Dream Master.


cover by McMacken (1965) Avon 1979
I thought my favourite would always be the 
Powers cover for "Bill" but we now have a tie.


Next A couple of okay Paul Lehr.



1971



1960

Then couple of okay Richard Powers.



1961


1966

Not sure, The Alien Way, Lou Feck.


(1965) 1977

The gem, I had never even seen photos of this cover for 
The Caves of Steel  by Ralph Brillhart. I think Pebble in the Sky
is my favourite Asimov but "Caves" is certainly the runner up.  
This copy will not be staying at the cabin.



(1954) Pyramid 1962

Monday we went south to photograph the shorebirds
on the sloughs before they migrate. We stopped in Hafford,
 for lunch, a small town pop. 360 where one old store now
 hosts a community garage sale. We got a great and cheap oil 
painting of grain elevators, hey this is the prairie folks, an Old
Virginia Smoking Tobacco can, an ex libris copy of 
The Phantom Tollbooth and an Ace Double for 50 cents with 
two wonderfully frantic covers by Emesh. Book publication 1962
 but the short stories were first published in 1954. Ace F-165.
Also saw some great birds and had a nice lunch.




Thursday, August 4, 2016



I had thought I would have lots of time to post to my various SF blogs while at the cabin. However I have posted mainly to my nature photo blog "That's Just the Wild Wood". While I collect my thoughts on Herbert's Hellstrom's Hive, I thought I would share this link a friend sent me to the work of Shigeru Komatsuzaki on Pink Tentacle. I enjoy this sort of Popular Mechanics, Air Wonder Stories, Frank Paul style illustration updated for the 1960's. I love the fact that it includes the rocket ships from Gerry and Sylvia Anderson's Thunderbirds, one of several SF series they did using Supermarionation, certainly one of the stranger SF entertainment offering of my childhood. I have to admit I did buy the first diecast Thunderbird 2 I saw, what fun is adulthood if we cannot buy the treasures we could not afford as kids.

Sci-fi illustrations by Shigeru Komatsuzaki
21 Jun 2010

"Here is a collection of sci-fi illustrations 

by the prolific Shigeru Komatsuzaki 
(1915-2001), whose fantastic work 
appeared on plastic model kit boxes 
and in magazines and picture books in the 
1960s to 1970s.

http://pinktentacle.com/2010/06/sci-fi-illustrations
-by-shigeru-komatsuzaki/